Category Archives: HV Morton in the media

The Whirligig, by D’Egville

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I was surprised and delighted to come across this little gem recently on a certain well known online auction site. It is a set of three caricatures by ‘D’Egville’, entitled Whirligig. They have been cut from an unknown newspaper or magazine and according to the person selling them they date to around 1928.

The first sketch features a Lady Askwith, with the caption ‘You can’t be too kind to maids’:

Lady Askwith small

N.B., this is not the better known Lady Asquith, wife of the British Prime Minister rather, according to thepeerage.com, she is Ellen (née Peel), Lady Askwith CBE, who died in 1962. She was a writer, sub-editor and war worker; former wife of Henry Graham, and later wife of 1st Baron Askwith. Although apparently a noted socialite, other sources reveal her to be most unpleasant individual – a fully signed up member of the eugenics socity who spoke out strongly against the keeping alive of children from ‘weak minded mothers’.

The second features Miss May Edgington, with the caption ‘Marriage is not a brilliant joke’:

May Edginton small

According to Wikipedia, May Edginton (originally Helen Marion Edginton, 1883 – 1957) was an English writer of over 50 popular novels which often portrayed escapes or solutions for heroines in unhappy domestic situations.

But it was the third cartoon which most interested me. It features our very own HV Morton striding through the crowds, hat on head, cigarette in mouth with socks and suspenders proudly and quite surreally on display, an indication of how familiar Morton would have been to a popular readership at the time and how much a part of everyday life and culture he was. The caption reads ‘The world should be delivered from the horror of trousers’:

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It took quite some time to track down details of the artist himself but I hope you agree it was time well spent, d’Egville is a most interesting character:

Alan Hervey d’Egville FRGS FCI (1891-1951) was a cartoonist, caricaturist, illustrator and writer, the son of Louis d’Egville of the Academy of Dramatic Art who taught dancing and deportment to royalty.

Educated in Berkhamsted (Hertfordshire, England) and in France, Germany and Spain, he studied motoring at Daimler, Paris and taught the tango at his father’s academy before working as private secretary to the chairman of Rolls-Royce. He later subscribed to Percy Bradshaw’s Press Art School.

Enlisting as an interpreter on the outbreak of World War I, he transferred to the Intelligence Department, later becoming Chief Intelligence Officer, 4th Corps and being mentioned in dispatches. After the war he attended art school and went on to write travelogues and to publish his humorous sketches and caricatures widely in Europe and the US including in Bystander, Pan, Sketch, Passing Show, Men Only, London Opinion, Tatler, Le Rire, Humorist, Punch, and others. During World War II he joined the security service, rising to the rank of Major. Following the cessation of hostilities he continued to publish in a variety of journals as well as writing scripts for Fox films, illustrating books, and working in advertising as a commercial artist. He was an enthusiastic skier and much of his work dealt with this subject.

(Sources: “Biographical Sketches of Cartoonists & Illustrators in the Swann Collection” By Sara Duke and “The Dictionary of 20th-century British Cartoonists and Caricaturists” By Mark Bryant).

Although the caricatures are amusing in their own way I’m afraid I havent a clue as to the significance of the ‘Whirligig‘ title or the meaning of the various bizarre captions. In a nutshell, I don’t get it! Although in all likelihood they had obvious and probably hilarious significance to a 1920’s audience their meaning is totally lost today. I am not aware that Morton ever advocated a society without trousers, even in jest! If anyone is able to enlighten me I would be most grateful.

With best wishes,

Niall Taylor

(Originally circulated as HVM Society Snippets – No.225 on 3 June 2018).

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Dewar McCormack interviews HV Morton

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In HVM Society Snippets – No.192, distributed in September last year (and now available on the blog) the featured article, from the 1974 Cape Town Weekend Magazine, made mention of HV Morton being the subject of a series of half-hour television interviews by one of the South African Broadcasting Company’s star broadcasters, Dewar McCormack.

And that is the subject of today’s post – an interview by Dewar McCormack of HV Morton. At least that’s my best guess – there is a slight element of mystery surrounding the interview.

The original cassette tape was sent to me by the author of Morton’s official biography, “In Search of HV Morton“, Michael Bartholomew, after an appeal I made a while back for audio-files featuring HVM. I am more grateful to Michael than I can say for his generosity in sending me the tape, I know he went to some considerable trouble to find it after it had temporarily disappeared, as these things do!

In Search of HVMIn Search of HV Morton” by Michael Bartholomew

The original recording from which the tape was made was in the BBC archives and the tape was labelled: Interview with D McCormack, BBC, June 75. After a deal of googling I failed to find a likely candidate of that name working for the BBC in 1975 who might have interviewed Morton. It must be – particularly given we know HVM was the subject of media interest in South Africa at the time – the interviewer is Dewar McCormack and the original interview was done by the SABC, possibly sold for distribution to the home market by the BBC, and then happened to end up (happily for us) in the archives. If anyone knows anything to the contrary I would be delighted to hear from them.

Being a computer whizz-kid (not!) it took me a mere twelve months or so to finally work out how to convert the audio recording to digital form and edit out some of the lengthy gaps in it. Once I’d done that it was a simple matter to transcribe it and make it available to all. It is a short piece and begins, quite unusually, with Morton himself speaking and with no introduction or context. It is clearly a fragment from a longer piece so inevitably leaves one wondering where the rest is and how it could be got hold of. One of these days when I have a bit more time I will trot along to the BBC archives myself and try to find it:

Interview with D McCormack, BBC, June 75. Length – 2 min 49 seconds, file size 2,642 KB

Morton: I was a rather lonely little boy (I was an only son) and (laughs) I was always wandering off alone and exploring things and discovering things. My sister reminded me once that I was in the habit of stopping when we were out on walks and saying “Stop! On this very same place, if you dug down, down, down, down, down, down; you might come to a Roman.” I’ve always been interested and always been curious and I’ve always been fascinated by history.

Before I write a book, I make a long list of all the people who are likely to appear in it – men and women – and I then make a chart of their lives and these charts are quite big, sometimes five foot square and I like to be able to say “oh, yes, Julius Caesar was born at that particular moment”. Then I look along the chart and see who else was alive at that moment, who else was just about to die, who else was just about to be born, and it gives one a great sense of history.

McCormac: I suppose every writer encounters his share of difficulties, his own particular ‘ration’ of problems. What’s the most difficult aspect of your writing?

Morton: Well, the wind and the weather, and I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been frustrated by weather conditions. From going to see remote places on the southern coast of Turkey, for example, and an island which I’ve never yet seen, called Crete, where wind and gale conspired to keep the place a secret from me.

McCormac: What is the genesis, so to speak, of this present book?

Morton: My book “In Search of England” was published… well, jolly nearly fifty years ago (laughs) and it’s gone on in various languages all over the world and it occurred to Methuen that they would like to make a selection from it and produce it in the most modern way which they have done, I think very attractively.

McCormac: This embraces just the England book, nothing more?

Morton: Yes, but it’s going on to the others – to Scotland and Ireland. And I think I ought to say that since these books were written nearly fifty years ago they have never been out of print!

HV Morton's England smallKeen Mortonites may have guessed the subject of the interview is the publication, by Eyre Methuen, of “HV Morton’s England” on 5 June 1975. This is a delightful, large-format volume edited by Patricia Haward with many photographic illustrations in colour and black and white, which comprises extracts from “In Search of England”, “The Call of England” and “I Saw Two Englands”.

It is readily available second hand and makes an excellent introduction to Morton’s works as well as bringing some of the places he described in the 1920’s to life and showing how they have changed (or in some cases stayed the same) over the years.

Niall Taylor, Glastonbury, Somerset, England

(This post was originally circulated as HVM Society Snippets – No.199)

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